Sunset over the sky and clouds.

Weather Trivia Fun Facts

We all follow regular weather updates of our local regions as well as the regions we wish to travel to.

Do you know about the instruments that are used in this forecasting? Read about these instruments and more on weather in this fun facts section.

Weather Fun Facts

Fun Fact
Weather
Strong sustained winds severe snowstorm having a speed at least of 56 km/h (35 mph) is called blizzards. It is different from a snowstorm in terms of the strength of the wind.
Fun Fact
Weather
The line that connects points having the same temperature is called isotherm. At 0oC, the isotherm is called the freezing level.
Fun Fact
Weather
The center of the hurricane is called an eye. A hurricane occurring in the Pacific Ocean is called a typhoon while the one occurring in the Atlantic is called a tropical cyclone.
Fun Fact
Weather
The concentration of the gaseous state of water called the water vapor in the air is called humidity. It is measured using a hygrometer.
Fun Fact
Weather
Most tornadoes in the world occur in the United States of America, followed by Canada. The highest frequency of tornadoes happens in Ontario.
Fun Fact
Weather
Nimbus is a low-level cloud that causes rain and snow. Examples of Nimbus clouds include cumulonimbus clouds and nimbostratus clouds.
Fun Fact
Weather
Meteorologists are people who study Earth’s atmosphere, weather, and climate conditions. They are specialized in areas such as air quality, climatology, and atmospheric convection.
Fun Fact
Weather
Cumulonimbus, also called thunderheads, are dark, vertical clouds that produce lightning, hailstorms and thunderstorms, and other severe weather conditions such as tornadoes.
Fun Fact
Weather
The device that is used to measure a temperature gradient is called a thermometer. Different types of thermometers are available depending upon their use, such as Indoor-outdoor thermometers and infrared thermometers.
Fun Fact
Weather
Air pressure, better known as atmospheric pressure or barometric pressure is the pressure within the atmosphere of the earth. It is measured in millibars or hectopascals (1 hectopascal = 1 millibar).

More General Knowledge Fun Facts